Ghostblogger Contest

Dear GhostBlogger Applicant:
 
Thank You: We thank you for having applied for our ghostblogger job.
 
5 Job Openings: As it turns out, we will be hiring at least 5 part-time ghostbloggers. We are offering 5 jobs, as we have decided to accelerate the process of growing our bankruptcy blog. Each ghost blogger will be expected to submit between at least 20 blog posts per month.
 
Next Step In Hiring Process: The next step in the hiring process requires that we find out how well you write, as compared to other applicants.
 
Test Blog Posts Please: To this end, we have included below 2 articles of “raw” material, so to speak. If you are still interested in the job...and we hope you are...we would ask that you write 2 sample blog posts, one “re-hashing”, so to speak, the content of one article, and one re-hashing the content of the other.
 
Why 2 Test Blog Posts? We have asked that you create 2 blog posts, instead of 1, for a reason. Our blog will cover 2 categories of information: The main focus will be on presenting the “nuts & bolts” aspects of a potential client’s passage into and out of debt, as related to bankruptcy. The secondary, but significant, focus will be on “current news events” related to bankruptcy. We therefore want to see how you “re-present” material in both categories.
 
Criteria For Test Posts:
 
Overall focus: Content that will encourage viewers to at least look into filing bankruptcy as a solution to their debt problems.
 
Content: Must be unique re-presentation of raw material supplied. Plagiarism is not acceptable.
 
Writing Style: Fresh, concise, conversational, encouraging, easy-to-understand, and engaging for a broad, general, consumer audience. It is probably best to think in terms of how you would write if you were writing copy for one of the “______________ for Dummies” books. (No offense intended, since these books are not really for dummies, since dummies would generally not be readers). 
 
Perspective: All posts should be written in the 2nd person. It is more personal if you talk to “you”.
 
Length: 400 words minimum, 600 maximum
 
Titles: The title must, in all cases, in a few words, accurately describe the gist of the post content.     
 

What We Will Pay: Before you start, please know this: Based upon the bids placed by applicants and based upon what other bankruptcy blog sites are paying, we will be paying $3.00 per 100 words to those of you who get hired. This is intended as a part-time, contract position and will require production of posts on a regular and dependable day-to-day basis.
 
Research Required: NONE. To make $3.00 per 100 words worth your time, the good news is that you will never have to do any independent research. We will supply you all the raw material you need. To this end, we will supply you with at least 4 books (for reference and raw material) and access to a Google Reader account already populated with an endless supply bankruptcy blog and bankruptcy news feeds. All you have to do is pick a topic and write.
 
Blog Platform: Drupal
 
How To Submit Your Test Posts: Please email them to ___________________________     
Deadline For Submissions: ____________________ (1 week from now)
 
Our Decision: We will make a decision not later than __________________________. If you get hired, we will submit you a detailed set of instructions on how to proceed.
 
Thank you so much for your interest in working with us on our law firm blog,
 
Andrew Gustafson
Attorney
 
 
Article 1 (Nuts & Bolts):
Which Should You Do?
Consolidate Your Debt Or Declare Bankruptcy?
Debt consolidation or bankruptcy? Which is better for you in the long run? You've accumulated a large amount of debt through credit card purchases, a home equity loan, a large car payment, and a mortgage with a high rate on a house that has lost value. On top of all that, you have some medical bills. Creditors and collectors are calling. You're not answering the phone. They are trying to get to you through your family. Your family is mad at you for that. You feel humiliated that you can't live up to your obligations, but you just lost your job. You don't want to lose your car and your house. That would just make things worse. So, what should you do, consolidate or declare bankruptcy? You might think that the more honorable thing to do would be to consolidate so you can pay your obligations rather than just dump them. Here's the advice of a Woodlands bankruptcy attorney. It is often better to draw the line on the debt and get a fresh start. If you're in Houston stop foreclosure by following this advice.
 

If you make the decision to consolidate your debt and continue paying your bills, you may find yourself in a bad, never-ending situation in which you pay and pay and pay, and all you're doing is paying interest. If that's all you're doing, you'll be making your debtors rich while keeping yourself in a hole from which you will never emerge. It may seem the honorable thing to do, and paying your debts is a good thing to do. But this course of action can lead to your losing the things you need the most, which are your car and your house. Where are you if you don't have these? You're homeless, but you still have your honor. The bad news is that your honor won't feed your kids.
 
When things seem hopeless, the best decision might be to bite the bullet and wipe your slate clean. Nobody wants the stigma of bankruptcy, but sometimes it is a hard decision that will leave you better off sooner through a fresh start rather than later as you slog through the swamp of interest payments. Here's the thing about bankruptcy: During the process, you are normally allowed to keep your home and your car. These are the two most basic things you need. You have to have a place to live, and you have to have a way to get to work. Of course, through this bankruptcy process, you need to have a lawyer. The lawyer can help you to sort out what you can keep and what you owe. He or she can also help you to recover your good credit rating in the shortest amount of time. Did you know that this period can be as short as two years?
 
So, as you can see, time and thought must be put into the decision of whether you will consolidate your debts or declare bankruptcy. And, remember, a good bankruptcy attorney is your best ally in making this decision.
 
 
Article 2 (Current News Event):
 
Auto rescue details coming; GM's debt-deal deadline looms.
 
GM, which has about $28 billion in unsecured debt, warned in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing that if it doesn't have a deal on the $1 billion by June 1, a default would arise that could trigger other defaults and "potentially require us to seek relief through a filing under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code."
 

If the administration's auto task force is unhappy with GM's and Chrysler's plans and progress, the government loans could be called and the companies would likely collapse. However, the administration has signaled that is not likely to happen.
 
President Barack Obama is expected to announce Monday a plan to aid the auto industry. Administration officials have indicated that the plan could include deadlines and conditions that GM and Chrysler, which are seeking an additional $21.6 billion, would have to meet to receive additional aid.
 
A person familiar with GM's bondholder negotiations said, "The big looming deadline for bondholders in general is June 1 because that's when the first bond matures."
 
GM and Chrysler are publicly not much further along in meeting the requirements of loans today than they were Feb. 17 when they submitted long-term viability plans.
 
Restructuring debt
 
The major sticking point continues to be restructuring the companies' debt. The loan terms call on GM to try to shed two-thirds of its unsecured debt and to get the UAW to accept half of the money owed the union for its retiree health care trust in stock rather than cash.
People familiar with GM's negotiations with bondholders have said it is unlikely a deal will be reached by Tuesday.
 
One person, for example, left no room for question when asked, saying it would "absolutely not" occur.
 
Bondholders have been critical of GM's viability plan, specifically questioning what they consider overly optimistic sales projections for the U.S. market.
 
Meanwhile, the UAW, which has tentatively agreed to concession contracts with GM and Chrysler, has accused the bondholders of resisting changes called for as part of the loans.
"It's a cage match," David Cole, chairman of the Center for Automotive Research, said. "The idea is for everybody to come out of the game alive."
 
Obama and his auto task force have been sending signals over the past week or so that seem to indicate the administration's openness to continue helping the companies as long as there is shared sacrifice.
 
Task force head Steven Rattner has said that bankruptcy is not the best option for the industry and that GM and Chrysler might need considerably more than the $21.6 billion they've requested.
Task force members have said the new plan to help Detroit might contain a framework -- namely, deadlines and conditions for revamping their business -- with unspecific pledges of aid to come if they prove their viability.

"That viability is largely going to depend on a restructuring that allows it" the industry "to compete in a very changed global economic environment, and to do so without continued government assistance," White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said Friday.
 
Talk that the government is not looking to push GM into bankruptcy could be making negotiations with bondholders more difficult, industry observers said.
 
"The financial bailout and the rhetoric could, in our view, harden bondholders' positions as they may see reduced risk of bankruptcy-driven losses in the value of their holdings," Efraim Levy, an equity analyst with Standard & Poor's, said in a note.
 
People familiar with GM's negotiations with bondholders have said it is unlikely a deal will be reached by Tuesday.
 
One person, for example, left no room for question when asked, saying it would "absolutely not" occur.
 
Bondholders have been critical of GM's viability plan, specifically questioning what they consider overly optimistic sales projections for the U.S. market.
 
Meanwhile, the UAW, which has tentatively agreed to concession contracts with GM and Chrysler, has accused the bondholders of resisting changes called for as part of the loans.
 
"It's a cage match," David Cole, chairman of the Center for Automotive Research, said. "The idea is for everybody to come out of the game alive."
 
Obama and his auto task force have been sending signals over the past week or so that seem to indicate the administration's openness to continue helping the companies as long as there is shared sacrifice.
 
Task force head Steven Rattner has said that bankruptcy is not the best option for the industry and that GM and Chrysler might need considerably more than the $21.6 billion they've requested.
Task force members have said the new plan to help Detroit might contain a framework -- namely, deadlines and conditions for revamping their business -- with unspecific pledges of aid to come if they prove their viability.
 
"That viability is largely going to depend on a restructuring that allows it" the industry "to compete in a very changed global economic environment, and to do so without continued government assistance," White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said Friday.
 
Talk that the government is not looking to push GM into bankruptcy could be making negotiations with bondholders more difficult, industry observers said.
 
"The financial bailout and the rhetoric could, in our view, harden bondholders' positions as they may see reduced risk of bankruptcy-driven losses in the value of their holdings," Efraim Levy, an equity analyst with Standard & Poor's, said in a note.

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